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about to to do 160 tstat and 3 bar sensor installation, purging air suggestions?

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I did a 160 tstat on my 2002 mustang, but didn't purge the air bubbles out of the system and it kept overheating, anyone got any suggestions on the proper way of getting the air bubbles out of the system for a 2010 SHO?

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That's a good question. I didn't have any issue with my 2012, I just changed it like normal. I just did my wife's 2013 Escaspe, no issue. So people bffgad issues, some didn't. Some have jacked up driver's side some too.

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That's a good question. I didn't have any issue with my 2012, I just changed it like normal. I just did my wife's 2013 Escaspe, no issue. So people bffgad issues, some didn't. Some have jacked up driver's side some too.

if you search 160 tstat and 3 bar sensor install on 2010 SHO on youtube you'll see a guy who did it and i asked him some questions on youtube and he said a Ford Technician told him after he purged the air for a long time, that these cars have a self-purging air system where we don't need to purge the air out. Does anyone know if that's true? THat would make things so much easier. When you say u changed it like normal, what exactly do you mean? Did u purge the air out or just replaced the tstat and filled up the lost coolant after driving it for a little bit?

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The process that worked perfectly for me is as follows:

 

Once the thermostat was replaced, I added the approximate amount of coolant that was lost to the degas bottle.  Obviously, that filled it above the full mark.  I then jacked up the right front so the degas bottle was the highest part of the system.

 

I started the car with the cap off the degas bottle and let it warm up until the thermostat opened.  I then revved the engine to around 2000 rpm for several seconds and then let it idle for several seconds.  I repeated the rev/idle process 2 or 3 times.   The extra coolant that I had added to the degas bottle was sucked into the engine replacing any air.   After letting the car cool off, I made sure there no leaks and that the coolant level was where I wanted it.

 

I checked it again after driving it for a day or so and the level never changed and the car temps were fine.

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The process that worked perfectly for me is as follows:

 

Once the thermostat was replaced, I added the approximate amount of coolant that was lost to the degas bottle.  Obviously, that filled it above the full mark.  I then jacked up the right front so the degas bottle was the highest part of the system.

 

I started the car with the cap off the degas bottle and let it warm up until the thermostat opened.  I then revved the engine to around 2000 rpm for several seconds and then let it idle for several seconds.  I repeated the rev/idle process 2 or 3 times.   The extra coolant that I had added to the degas bottle was sucked into the engine replacing any air.   After letting the car cool off, I made sure there no leaks and that the coolant level was where I wanted it.

 

I checked it again after driving it for a day or so and the level never changed and the car temps were fine.

good advice and i'll do this, but "degas bottle"? is that some foreign name for a coolant tank or overflow tank?

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I used the term "coolant tank" on another forum and someone asked if I meant the degas bottle! Lol

lol, well that's the first time I heard that phrase used, it's that what it's called, the overflow tank on our car? I haven't looked at it yet

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Just remember, supposedly the coolant in our cars is very specific and is a Ford product. You can't use just any coolant to add to the system once you do the thermostat. 

what? You can't use the one that says 50/50 mix "works on 100% of every make"?. 

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Go to the FORD dealership and get the correct color fluid. DON'T GO CHEAP ON THIS!, DON'T MIX AFTERMARKET FLUID EITHER!, that being said, get there premix antifreeze, its like $10.00 a gallon.

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Go to the FORD dealership and get the correct color fluid. DON'T GO CHEAP ON THIS!, DON'T MIX AFTERMARKET FLUID EITHER!, that being said, get there premix antifreeze, its like $10.00 a gallon.

so that 50-50 mix that works on all vehicles is a lie and can damage your car?

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Get the Motorcraft coolant from your Ford dealer or from an auto parts store that carries Motorcraft. Everyone is correct, it is extremely specific and you won't find it in Walmart.

 

Is called "Motorcraft Specialty Green Engine Coolant with bittering agent"......... whatever the hell that means.  If I recall correctly, a gallon was like $22 (for 100 percent coolant, not a 50/50 mix).  I would have got the 50/50 mix but I found the hundred percent first, so I just picked up some distilled water. I'm just guessing from memory on the price.   Regarding the name, I just went out to my garage and read that exact description/name above,  that is on the front of the gallon jug so, that it would be 100%  accurate.  When I called  auto parts stores, many of them told me they had never heard of specialty green coolant. Don't let anyone tell you that what they have is the same. Get the exact name that I listed above.

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