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bpd1151

Open Element PCV Mod.....

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I wanted to share with the community, a little mod that was suggested to me by a fellow, quite knowledgeable, Gen4 SHO owner while attending the 21st Annual National SHO Convention a few weeks back.

 

It is something small, but I understood the purpose of it, after it was explained (and I visually observed the dirty filter 1st hand) the necessity of swapping these parts out.

 

I was also told that the primary purpose of the stock set up was designed with Emissions in mind, and really nothing more.

 

Anyhow, I removed the stock plastic tubing that comes from the PCV and leads over to the driver's side air intake tube.

 

Here's an image of the piece I am talking about:

 

2012-07-28_09-35-53_378.jpg

 

 

Apparently, over a period of time (if left in place) y'all will find a film of oil weeping into your intake tubing and eventually the throttle body as this tube allows for excess oil to be recycled or returned, rather than it being vented to the atmosphere.

 

 

In it's place, I purchased this part (# 62-1330) from K&N Filters:

 

2012-07-23_10-43-36_151.jpg

 

 

Installed it here:

 

2012-07-28_09-32-20_871.jpg

 

2012-07-28_09-33-58_611.jpg

 

 

You will need to cap off the end of the tube where it leads into the intake.... here's the opening that's created after removing the tube:

 

2012-07-28_09-32-39_795.jpg

 

 

The size is 5/8" in diameter in case you're wondering. I bought these from a local auto parts supply store:

 

2012-07-28_09-30-08_50.jpg

 

 

It will look like this once you've capped off the opening:

 

2012-07-28_09-33-12_282.jpg

 

 

Not sure what other benefits this little mod is good for..... certainly open to input.

 

Mind you, there was a tad bit of alcohol consumption occurring during the Convention, and I don't recall entirely all of the conversation I had regarding this mod, so those in the know, feel free to chime in.

 

I believe fellow EBOF Premium Member Darrelli is also running this same set up for w/e it's worth :noidea:

 

Mike :yo:

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Nice step by step Mike. Despite your understandibly temporarily impaired memory, are you saying that the main benefit of the mod is to reduce the introduction of oil into the intake?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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As best as my foggy recollection can recall..... yes.

 

I asked when it was suggested I do this.... "Well why would I do that?" Reply.... "Because eventually you'll get oil weeping back into your intake".

 

"Oh, well why then would they (FMC) design it that way?" Reply.... "Emissions".

 

So I inquired about part numbers and what not, turned out I copied down the wrong numbers. Then found it on my own, and the caps, and wallah.

 

Thus this mod.

 

Everything else is a blur..... which is why I offered up for anyone else who may be "in the know" about what other benefits this may provide? :noidea:

 

I'm all ears :ear:

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Do you have to run without your engine cover all the time because of this?

 

I read a lot about the Coyote also as I have one in my 79 Cobra. A popular mod is an oil separator to replace the same plastic tube on the Coyote. Some guys are claiming 1-2 HP, and in theory it will increase and/or maintain fuel quality/octane (because of the tiny winy bit of oil getting in).

 

I say good mod :thumb: thanks for posting.

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My engine cover still fits over it and is still on the car.

 

Although i've been debating (given the incredible heat of this Summer) whether or not i'll still leave it on for now....

 

Sent from my DROID3 using Tapatalk 2

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Remember school when the teacher said all objects of different weights fall at the same speed. Someone called b.s. and mentioned a feather vs a rock, well when put into a vacuum the feather drops like a rock. This same vacuum helps prevent pumping losses in an engine and gives abit of horse power while doing it. Not only that it prevents your crank seals and other gaskets from drooling all over the place.

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Mike where did you find the K&N filter? I always thought the PCV did nothing more then recycle oily vapors back into the engine rather then into the atmosphere. I know back in the age of dinosaurs, engines had "breather" vents that vented those vapors into the atmosphere, or rather normally towards the ground under the car, or the oil filler cap that was on the valve covers were vented to allow gases to escape. I didn't think the PCV had anything to do with engine vacuum but I am certainly not all that knowledgeable on it. My guess is the open filter would help lower internal pressure in the top end of the engine.

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Funny' date=' I thought a pcv put a vacuum on your engines bottom end, aiding in pumping loss and making horsepower. Not to be a dick, but isn't this counterproductive?[/quote']

 

There is no vacuume on the PVC line, It is under positive pressure.

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There is no vacuume on the PVC line' date=' It is under positive pressure.[/quote']

 

There is most definitely vacuum in the PCV line. Positive Crank Ventilation, it's positively vented by a vacuum rather then venting just to atmosphere.

 

As to making power or loosing power could only be proven on a dyno, I have never been under the impression it made power or not. Always was purely emissions.

 

And finally in Mike case, all he done here is remove a crossover tube from the front bank to the rear bank the rear bank. The rear bank is where the PCV system is located. So in effect I see no real changes. And this how many older cars PCV systems where set up, with a vent a vent on one bank and PCV valve on the other.

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Good knowing I've begun a spirited debate here....

 

To reiterate, I never claimed any power gains, or losses (refer to the OP)....

 

I am under the understanding that performing this mod was primarily for preventing oil from weeping back into the intake tubing and potentially, the TB.

 

As far as any other benefits, tangible, or perceived..... is what I was seeking input on.

 

Let the discussions continue :argue:

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Would you decribe even any "de minimus" changes in performance? ^^^ LOL.

 

p.s. I love this forum. I love learning and the honesty of members. Most other car forums are full of guys telling the rest that they have the best set up and there is no room for respectful debate.

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Here is some info I found on PCV system.

 

What does the PCV valve do?

 

 

 

By Jakob Jelling

Autorized.com

 

The PCV valve is a control device which sends partially burned gases that come from the engine's crankcase to the combustion chamber. Its name, PCV means Positive Crankcase Ventilation and is one of the oldest and most used emission control devices. Although its name might sound very complicated, it is a very simple device and its function can be easily understood.

 

Due to its tasks, the PCV valve is not only very useful but also implies important benefits. It completely eliminates crankcase emissions efficiently, avoiding that it becomes an air pollution factor. Besides, it also keeps the system free of moisture due to the constant air circulation that it implies.

 

Besides, the PCV valve also helps keeping the oil and the engine in proper shape extending their life as well. Also, its mechanism is very important for preventing the appearance of engine corrosion as well as it helps improving fuel economy. This way, the PCV valve is very important for different aspects and helps car owners maintaining their car’s engines in shape as well as providing them with a good administration of the fuel economy

 

The PCV valve routes crankcase partially burned gases back to the engine. Once these gases go back to the engine, they are re-burned, allowing this way a better use and administration of fuel. The cylinders are an important part in the process since they are who re-burn the gases rerouted from the PVC valve and have a central role in it.

 

Crankcase emissions can be a great source of air pollution, and therefore the PCV valve is very useful and important not only for the car functioning but also for the environment and health as well. Besides, this valve requires little maintenance and must be replaced at about 40.000 miles. This way, the PCV valve is an easy to maintain piece which implies an important amount of benefits that affect not only the car and its owner but also those who surround him and the environment in general due to the way in which it prevents gases from becoming air pollution factors.

 

More info

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crankcase_ventilation_system

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Thank you for finding / researching / posting that.... :hail:

 

If I were to read between the lines, I would interpret that as it's primary function being related to emissions protocols.

 

Neither a performance gain, or detraction.

 

Interesting.

 

Sent from my DROID3 using Tapatalk 2

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I was alway told and read in articles that it's worth a small amount of horsepower, I would like to see a before and after dyno test of this mod but know that realistically it will never happen. Keep the mods coming though, I'm always interested in what were doing here.

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I would agree with Steve since I think most serious race engines do not incorporate a PCV valve. And I would think if there were any performance gains to be had from having it that the Pro Stock guys would be using the valve, since they will use anything they can to gain any advantage.

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Thank you for finding / researching / posting that.... :hail:

 

If I were to read between the lines, I would interpret that as it's primary function being related to emissions protocols.

 

Neither a performance gain, or detraction.

 

Interesting.

 

Sent from my DROID3 using Tapatalk 2

Mike I believe it's only function was emmisions reduction when they first started installing PCV valves. I can't remember my first car to have one but the PCV valve was in the valve cover with a line that ran back to the intake manifold right under the carb. Nothing more then that. There was a vacuum created at the intake manifold but I am sure it was only a emmissions control, nothing more.

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That PCV write up was interesting. Maybe the benefits are why guys are using seperators instead of just a filter? Not sure. I have to believe there is a small gain to be had though. Oil even a tiny amount getting into air and fuel has to be a detriment. Also I wonder if pumping hot air back through the engine is also detrimental.

 

Next guy to get a dyno run 1st pull with the tube on, and eliminate like bpd did for the 2nd pull then report back!

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That PCV write up was interesting. Maybe the benefits are why guys are using seperators instead of just a filter? Not sure. I have to believe there is a small gain to be had though. Oil even a tiny amount getting into air and fuel has to be a detriment. Also I wonder if pumping hot air back through the engine is also detrimental.

 

Next guy to get a dyno run 1st pull with the tube on, and eliminate like bpd did for the 2nd pull then report back!

Great idea, I can't wait to see the results. I agree the hot dirty air getting put back into the engine can't help, but it's a system that has been done since the last 60's or early 70's, I just can't remember when the PCV first started appearing.

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