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New / Replacement / Updated Spark Plug # ???


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I'm due in for my next oil change relatively soon and still have a few of those freebie oil changes form the Dealership to take advantage of....

 

My question is, now that I'm slightly a tick over 30K on my odometer, I was contemplating having them swap out the spark plugs for those newer ones I've heard about.....

 

Although I haven't had any problems with the original ones that came with my SHO when I bought her 2 years ago, I would like to know if anyone out there has, or knows of, the proper Ford Part # for the updated / replacement spark plug that some of you have switched over to?

 

Also, do any of you know even beyond that updated plug #, is there, or are there, any aftermarket companies out there that are producing plugs for our SHO's yet?

 

Like those NGK Iridium E3's or w/e?

 

Thanks in advance for any help with this :hail:

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I think pretty much everyone has a plug now Mike... I'll post up the part #s

 

Thanks Darrell, I do appreciate it.

 

I mean if there's a "better" after market performance type plug that would be more suited for our applications (since you and I have similar mods) then that'd be great.

 

But even if the updated plug from FoMo is better than what came with from the production / assembly line, that'd be ok to....

 

But just to be clear, I'd prefer THE BEST plug currently available.

 

BTW..... nice to see you on the boards once again Darrell :thumb:

 

Hope all's been going well with you my friend :wave:

 

Sent from my DROID3 using Tapatalk

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Mike,

 

I installed updated # plugs about a month ago. All of a sudden at 34,000 mi. I was getting a slight misfire when in heavy traffic, stop & go driving. Acted like plug was loading up. Eventually check engine light came on and the code was a misfire in #6 cylinder. That's the front radiator side extreme right cylinder. The plug looked good and was an almost perfect light brown. But the gap was greater than the stock .035. New Ford plugs are made in Japan and come gaped at .035 and are not adjustable. Personally, I would use the new # Ford plug. (Motorcraft SP-528 CYFS-12-Y3). Check to see what Livernois suggests. Believe they are around $4. a piece from Rock Auto.

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A textbook explanation....

 

***********************************************************************************************

The spark plug is in the center of the four valves in each cylinder.

 

*The spark plug is quite simple in theory: It forces electricity to arc across a gap, just like a bolt of lightning. The electricity must be at a very high voltage in order to travel across the gap and create a good spark. Voltage at the spark plug can be anywhere from 40,000 to 100,000 volts.

 

The spark plug must have an insulated passageway for this high voltage to travel down to the electrode, where it can jump the gap and, from there, be conducted into the engine block and grounded. The plug also has to withstand the extreme heat and pressure inside the cylinder, and must be designed so that deposits from fuel additives do not build up on the plug.

 

Spark plugs use a ceramic insert to isolate the high voltage at the electrode, ensuring that the spark happens at the tip of the electrode and not anywhere else on the plug; this insert does double-duty by helping to burn off deposits. Ceramic is a fairly poor heat conductor, so the material gets quite hot during operation. This heat helps to burn off deposits from the electrode.

 

Some cars require a hot plug. This type of plug is designed with a ceramic insert that has a smaller contact area with the metal part of the plug. This reduces the heat transfer from the ceramic, making it run hotter and thus burn away more deposits. Cold plugs are designed with more contact area, so they run cooler.

 

The difference between a "hot" and a "cold" spark plug is in the shape of the ceramic tip.

 

The carmaker will select the right temperature plug for each car. Some cars with high-performance engines naturally generate more heat, so they need colder plugs. If the spark plug gets too hot, it could ignite the fuel before the spark fires; so it is important to stick with the right type of plug for your car.

*****************************************************************************************************************

I run very cold plugs in our 502 boat engine as it sometimes runs at 5,200 RPM for several minutes straight... Also run a very low temp thermostat.

 

Since it seems that the EB SHO runs hotter than the EB Flex, it would likely benefit more from cooler plugs. That does not mean that EB Flex owners who are using W/M and running at the strip, shouldn't consider cooler than stock plugs... I just run what Torrie suggests.....

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Thanks Mike and Bob :thumb:

 

I also found some info while you guys posted those replies.... does what appears below seem to make some sense??

 

The type of plug you use will depend on your level of modification. A good upgrade for a stock engine is to replace the OEM plugs with a type known as "cooler" than stock.

 

The idea behind cooler plugs is that they will dissipate heat away from the electrodes more quickly than standard plugs. Since excess heat in the combustion chamber is one of the chief causes of knock, running cooler plugs helps to lower the chances of it occurring.

 

Understand that a cooler plug does not have a "cooler spark". The reason a cooler plug stays cool is because it has a smaller insulator, so heat can more easily escape.

 

An OEM plug is good for a stock engine and for drivers with conservative driving habits.

 

Running a plug that is one stage, or one step cooler is for spirited driving, or for moderate engine modification.

 

Plugs that are two, or even three stages, or steps cooler than an OEM plug should only be considered for use in cars running very high boost and/or used exclusively for racing.

 

The size of your turbos and the mods to your engine/exhaust will determine your level of boost and the plugs you should use. Using plugs that are too cool can result in plug fouling.

 

This is a condition where a plug's electrodes become coated in soot/debris, preventing easy starting or even causing misfires.

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Also looks like the proper Denso Part # for those ITV22's is: 267700-2500

 

I'm wondering if I should be picking up a set of 6 of these and toss'n 'em in while my mechanic pal and I install the Full Meth Kit next week?

 

Especially since (from what I understand) that the tune file Rick from LMS sent me for the meth kit has raised boost even beyond the "normal" Stage 4.

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Also looks like the proper Denso Part # for those ITV22's is: 267700-2500

 

I'm wondering if I should be picking up a set of 6 of these and toss'n 'em in while my mechanic pal and I install the Full Meth Kit next week?

 

Especially since (from what I understand) that the tune file Rick from LMS sent me for the meth kit has raised boost even beyond the "normal" Stage 4.

 

I would and that is my plan.

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DENSO's site suggests Advanced Auto Parts & also Carquest. I went to both today & neither had them in stock, and both also claimed they were unable to order them from any of their "outsourced" vendors.

 

So I fired off an email to DENSO themselves letting them know perhaps they should stop referring people to them with the kind of replies I received and then I also fired off an email to my local speed shop (WinnersCircleOnline.com) as they are only 5min from me but were closed today.

 

Looks like most places refer to this specific plug as a stock # of 5340 if that helps out any of you.

 

Hopefully I can get 'em in my hands by Tuesday or Wednesday at the latest.

 

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Sounds like finding the Denso plugs is going to be as big a pain as me finding the Royal Purple oil filter in my area...since they have a warehouse fairly close to you (in Ohio) my suggestion is Summit Racing or Jeg's Automotive...they both have great service and fair prices and quick normal shipping.

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It shouldn't be to hard to find the Denso's. They are the same plug(part and all) that i ran in my MS3. Stock heat range is ITV20 and 1 step colder is ITV22. I got my last set from Amazon and you can also get them from any vendor that sells mazdaspeed parts. Given the durability mods i'm working on this year i'll probably be waiting until next year to do a tune so i'll be getting the denso plugs in the stock heat range.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, I still couldn't find the Denso plugs even from my local Speed Shop, which even the employees there found that rather odd.

 

Anyhow, I ended up ordering the equivalent in NGK's.

 

Below are some pics of the NGK product number (again, these are 2 stages colder, and the ITV22 crossover for NGK's application) and a couple of pics of the used, OEM Motorcraft Platinum plugs that came in the car. My mileage is almost 32K for reference. All of my plugs were evenly worn, and each came out pretty easily.

 

 

I did notice that on two of the coil boots, the rubber sleeve was incorrectly compressed and had been installed in this fashion from the assembly line. Found that odd.

 

 

Plugs3of3.jpg

 

Plugs2of3.jpg

 

Plugs1of3.jpg

 

 

For those of you that are interested, I did receive an email reply form Denso. If all of you recall, I had complained to them via email about the fact that their own website refers potential customers to two separate National Chain Based Auto Parts stores for which to purchase their products from....

 

Well I wasn't even able to special order their plugs even from the companies Denso recommended. At the point I recv'd the email reply from them, it was too late for me as I had already ordered up the NGK's.

 

Denso did state that their products can be ordered online by following this link here ------> http://www.densoproducts.com

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Mike, those plugs are much dirtier and darker than mine were, even the one that was occasionally missing at low rpm. One comment on colder plugs, our W/M systems, in your case just M... cool the combustion chambers by up to 300 deg, according to Devilsown site. They sell W/M kits, including braided metal line options, and stainless metal fittings. So... colder plugs may not be needed at the boost levels our turbos can put out, even with a 3 bar sensor, like I have. Did anyone ask Rick or Livernois about this?

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Good info to know.

 

I'm happy with the NGK's for now.

 

Hopefully the link I posted which I recv'd from Denso, as well as the the 2 links you provided, will benefit others in the EB community though.

 

Always a plus to help out :thumb:

 

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Mike, those plugs are much dirtier and darker than mine were, even the one that was occasionally missing at low rpm.

 

One comment on colder plugs, our W/M systems, in your case just M... cool the combustion chambers by up to 300 deg, according to Devilsown site.

 

They sell W/M kits, including braided metal line options, and stainless metal fittings.

 

So... colder plugs may not be needed at the boost levels our turbos can put out, even with a 3 bar sensor, like I have. Did anyone ask Rick or Livernois about this?

 

 

Yes, EBB, I noticed my plugs were pretty damn dirty. Which is why I posted the pics, along with my mileage, so others can make their own decisions on when to swap theirs out.

 

I was surprised honestly, but glad in retrospect, that a fresh new set of NGK's are in her now.

 

As far as what comes with other companies kits, etc.

 

ehh, 6 of one, 1/2 dozen of the other.

 

I did opt to run braided line from the pump to the nozzle. Reinforced black rubber from the tank to the pump. Unless it's changed recently, LMS does NOT supply any hoses with their kit. OR fittings for that matter. That set me back another $150 in total.

 

Darrell is running a 2 stage colder plug. I consulted with him prior to ordering mine as I was curious about driveability issues, etc.

 

He reported no problems, and considering he is essentially in the same climate as I, I don't anticipate any issues either.

 

Both of us have the 3bar MapV sensor as well.

 

You can always consult Rick too and report back your findings EBB, I'm sure you'll post up about any info you receive. :kiss:

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